Month: April 2017

Fulbright Open Houses coming up!

Are you interested in learning more about the Fulbright U.S. Student Program? Are unsure and want to learn more? Are you applying but need some advice or have some questions?

Did you miss our information sessions?

You’re always welcome to connect with the campus Fulbright Program Advisor, Mark Lilleleht, by phone (608.265.6070) or email (awards@iris.wisc.edu) with questions or to make an appointment. But… we’ve also got drop-in open houses for your Fulbright questions!

Fulbright U.S. Student Program (FUSP) 2018-19 is open!

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program (FUSP) 2018-19 is open and we will be having two workshops next week!

On Tuesday, the UW-Madison’s Writing Center is hosting:

Writing Your Way to a Fulbright: The Application Process
Tuesday, April 25
3:30-5:00pm
Helen C. White Hall
Register @ http://writing.wisc.edu/Workshops/Application_Fulbright_essay.html

On Wednesday, Mark Lilleleht, the campus Fulbright Program Advisor, will hold a general information session:

FUSP Information Session
Wednesday, April 26
2:30-3:30pm
206 Ingraham Hall

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program is open to undergraduates graduating in December 2017 or May 2018, currently enrolled graduate students, and alumni. Applicants to the Fulbright U.S. Student program must be U.S. citizens.

Full details on the campus process (and deadlines) are available @ http://go.wisc.edu/fusp

If you cannot make a session but would like to learn more, please contact Mark Lilleleht @ awards@iris.wisc.edu or 608.265.6070 to set up an appointment (skype appointments for those abroad are also encouraged).

LACIS Faculty Releases New Book

Pablo F. Gomez is assistant professor in the Department of Medical History and Bioethics and the Department of History & also part of the LACIS core faculty. Check out his latest book “The Experiential Caribbean“!

Opening a window on a dynamic realm far beyond imperial courts, anatomical theaters, and learned societies, Pablo F. Gómez examines the strategies that Caribbean people used to create authoritative, experientially based knowledge about the human body and the natural world during the long seventeenth century. Gómez treats the early modern intellectual culture of these mostly black and free Caribbean communities on its own merits and not only as it relates to well-known frameworks for the study of science and medicine.

Drawing on an array of governmental and ecclesiastical sources—notably Inquisition records—Gómez highlights more than one hundred black ritual practitioners regarded as masters of healing practices and as social and spiritual leaders. He shows how they developed evidence-based healing principles based on sensorial experience rather than on dogma. He elucidates how they nourished ideas about the universality of human bodies, which contributed to the rise of empirical testing of disease origins and cures. Both colonial authorities and Caribbean people of all conditions viewed this experiential knowledge as powerful and competitive. In some ways, it served to respond to the ills of slavery. Even more crucial, however, it demonstrates how the black Atlantic helped creatively to fashion the early modern world.